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20170915

Akagu Igbo Alphabet

Akagu, the nsibidi derived Igbo alphabet.

29 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. C does not exist as a stand-a-lone character in Igbo alphabet. It only comes as "Ch." Just FYI.

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  2. Do you know the creator and the date of its creation?

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    1. I suspect this as a fan-made fictional writing system.

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    2. Insibidi is actually a real writing system that was used. It’s not fan made, troll.

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    3. It was created with this project in 2010 to help gloss logograms and for other uses like writing particles, etc. They originate from simplified original nsibidi ideographs chosen mostly from their sound in Igbo (if they should be 'sounded').

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  3. I love this! I am trying to learn. Please, what is these diacritics, why are there 5 & 6? Other than uda-elu & uda-ala, what other one is being represented?

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  4. I also wanted to know why you have "X" here? If I am not mistaken, that sound does not exist in Igbo.

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    Replies
    1. The x is a sound called voiced postalveolar fricative. look it up in the IPA to hear how it sounds. people from Abia and Imo State use that sound.

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  5. Because the British modified the alphabet before they knew the language and how it worked

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  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  7. They should have used this alphabet to develop Wakanda, instead, they used an alphabet that actually has Phoenician origin.

    https://typewakanda.com/

    Is this font available for download??

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  8. I found the font, I did a test typing in my language. How do I use compound phonemes like 'hnw' to display the corresponding symbol?
    How does accenting work?

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    Replies
    1. @joao can you post the link to where you found the font?

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    2. https://www.dropbox.com/s/n2476tb37ahz7pm/Akagu.ttf?dl=0

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    3. The font is only functioning now as a work around, the acute accent and grave accent (if you can find the shortcuts on your respective systems) should work, and for the nasal marks ạ ą ä should work for instance, the former marks work for m and n as well, and latter should work for h as well.

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    4. The following combinations do not work on my system:
      aw, ah, eh, ih, uh
      The fourth and fifth variations for 'e, E, ee' also do not, none for 'h and H', 'MM and NN'

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  9. https://www.dropbox.com/s/n2476tb37ahz7pm/Akagu.ttf?dl=0

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  10. I wanted to see the Black Panther poster in nsibidi

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    Replies
    1. They used nsibidi and adinkra symbols as decoration, but the font used as Wakanda alphabet was the tifinagh, Berber originated outside Africa.
      They should have used akagu, which comes from sub-Saharan origins

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  11. This is marvelous. Though I wonder maybe if using the nwagu aneke script would be easier to write for the average person

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    1. The Nwagu Aneke script has more glyphs since it is syllabary, it also has some morphographs (logograms) mixed in which is similar to this project.

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  12. Will there be a unicode nsibidi?
    There are no numbers in nsibidi?
    Would the syllabary ndyuka have some reminissence nsibidi?

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    Replies
    1. There's no unicode for nsibidi since in this project at least it is still an emerging writing system.

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    2. @Luiz check out what I did here https://twitter.com/igbolectures/status/1103852450518315008
      I tried to make the Black Panther poster with Nsibidi.
      What do you think?

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  13. @Luiz check out what I did here https://twitter.com/igbolectures/status/1103852450518315008
    I tried to make the Black Panther poster with Nsibidi.
    What do you think?

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  14. This is nice and all, but could you make a post explaining how the original system worked so we know what is different with your script?

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    Replies
    1. Nsibidi is originally ideographic, this is logographic or morphographic.

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This blog is about African writing, the nsibidi script. This website include many nsibidi symbols meaning a lot of different things. All images do not hold a copyright unless indicated so. You can copy, distribute, and sell any information/images you find on this website. Public Domain.